Behind Gujarat boycott: Dalits gained’t decide carcasses, need equal therapy

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Accusing the higher castes within the village of discrimination, Dalits in Lhor determined to cease disposing animal carcasses as a part of their “customary” service saying it was a “filthy and unpaid for” job that was thrust upon them.

Round six months in the past, a buffalo belonging to Vikram Thakor died. He dragged the carcass to an uninhabited place on the outskirts of Lhor village in Mehsana with a tractor.

“We have to do it on our own,” Vikram stated, “Dalits in the village stopped picking up carcasses two years ago. Some months back, a dog died near my house, and I had to dispose it in a similar manner.”

Accusing the higher castes within the village of discrimination, Dalits in Lhor determined to cease disposing animal carcasses as a part of their “customary” service saying it was a “filthy and unpaid for” job that was thrust upon them.

And this refusal is among the many foremost causes, they alleged, that the higher castes within the village referred to as for a social boycott of Dalits on Might 8, after a Dalit groom took out the primary marriage ceremony procession in Lhor on a horse. Primarily based on a criticism, police have registered an FIR in opposition to 5 higher caste males, together with the sarpanch and deputy sarpanch of the village, for ordering the social boycott.

Thakors kind the bulk in Lhor, which has a inhabitants of over 1,600. Vikram and several other different Thakors in Lhor point out that although they don’t just like the Dalits’ assertion in not disposing of carcasses, they can not pressure them. Thakors denied the accusation that the difficulty is linked to the alleged boycott.

However most Dalits imagine in any other case. “Our old generation used to lift the carcasses of animals and the tradition has continued for hundreds of years. We (the Dalits) were not getting any remuneration for it and the service was imposed on us as a custom for long. They think Dalits have to do it,” stated Mukesh Shrimali.

“Nobody wants to do this job compulsorily, it is that filthy. At least 4-5 of us are doctors now; we have a professor, there is one head constable and a lawyer from the community in the village… our young generation is not ready to do this job. So, our leaders decided not to lift the carcasses of animals.”

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